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Recent Citations

The 3.8 Å structure of the U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP: Insights into spliceosome assembly and catalysis. Wan R, Yan C et al. Science. 2016 Jan 29;351(6272):466-75.

A mechanism of viral immune evasion revealed by cryo-EM analysis of the TAP transporter. Oldham ML, Hite RK et al. Nature. 2016 Jan 28;529(7587):537-40.

Structure of transcribing mammalian RNA polymerase II. Bernecky C, Herzog F et al. Nature. 2016 Jan 28;529(7587):551-4.

The structural basis of actin organization by vinculin and metavinculin. Kim LY, Thompson PM et al. J Mol Biol. 2016 Jan 16;428(1):10-25.

MMB-GUI: a fast morphing method demonstrates a possible ribosomal tRNA translocation trajectory. Tek A, Korostelev AA, Flores SC. Nucleic Acids Res. 2016 Jan 8;44(1):95-105.

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News

July 23, 2015

Chimera production release 1.10.2 is now available. Fixes include code signing for Mac OS X installation. The 1.10 series will be the last to support OS X 10.6 and 10.7. See the release notes for details.

January 9, 2015

Chimera production release 1.10.1 is now available. 64-bit builds are recommended for all capable platforms, and the 1.10 series will be the last to support OS X 10.6 and 10.7. See the release notes for details.

November 5, 2014

Chimera production release 1.10 is now available. 64-bit builds are recommended for all capable platforms, and v1.10 will be the last to support OS X 10.6 and 10.7. See the release notes for what's new.

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Upcoming Events

UCSF Chimera is a highly extensible program for interactive visualization and analysis of molecular structures and related data, including density maps, supramolecular assemblies, sequence alignments, docking results, trajectories, and conformational ensembles. High-quality images and animations can be generated. Chimera includes complete documentation and several tutorials, and can be downloaded free of charge for academic, government, non-profit, and personal use. Chimera is developed by the Resource for Biocomputing, Visualization, and Informatics (RBVI), funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIGMS P41-GM103311).

UCSF ChimeraX (or simply ChimeraX) is the next-generation molecular visualization program from the RBVI, following UCSF Chimera. It is in early development and not yet publicly released, with release anticipated sometime in 2016.

Feature Highlight

5 comparative models
Model List dialog

Chimera Interface to Modeller

Chimera provides a graphical interface to running the program Modeller, either locally or via a web service hosted by the UCSF RBVI. Two types of calculations are available:

  • Comparative (homology) modeling. Theoretical models of a protein target are generated using at least one known related template structure and a target-template sequence alignment. There are several ways to generate these inputs in Chimera. See also the Comparative Modeling tutorial.

  • Building parts of a protein without using a template. Missing segments can be built de novo, or existing segments refined by generating additional possible conformations.
Modeller is developed by the Sali Lab.

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Gallery Sample

Thermosome

Thermosomes are hollow balls inside which proteins are folded. They are found in the cytosol of eukaryotes and in archaea. Eukaryotic thermosomes have 8 different protein subunits, while archaeal ones are composed of one, two or three different proteins. The one shown from Thermoplasma acidophilum has two distinct proteins colored blue and yellow, each present in 8 copies. The two proteins have 60% sequence identity and are very similar in structure. One monomer is shown as a ribbon. Actin and tubulin are folded by eukaryotic thermosomes.

Protein Data Bank model 1a6d.

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