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Recent Citations

Architecture of the 90S pre-ribosome: A structural view on the birth of the eukaryotic ribosome. Kornprobst M, Turk M et al. Cell. 2016 Jul 14;166(2):380-93.

Cryo-EM structure of a human cytoplasmic actomyosin complex at near-atomic resolution. von der Ecken J, Heissler SM et al. Nature. 2016 Jun 30;534(7609):724-8.

Rational design and validation of a vanilloid-sensitive TRPV2 ion channel. Yang F, Vu S et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2016 Jun 28;113(26):E3657-66.

Atomic structure of Hsp90-Cdc37-Cdk4 reveals that Hsp90 traps and stabilizes an unfolded kinase. Verba KA, Wang RY et al. Science. 2016 Jun 24;352(6293):1542-7.

TRPV1 structures in nanodiscs reveal mechanisms of ligand and lipid action. Gao Y, Cao E et al. Nature. 2016 Jun 16;534(7607):347-51.

(Previously featured citations...)

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News

July 15, 2016

Chimera production release 1.11 is now available. 64-bit builds are now recommended for all capable platforms, and v1.11 will be the last to support 32-bit builds. See the release notes for details.

June 23, 2016

PLOS Computational Biology announces winning T-shirt design created by Luigi Di Costanzo (RCSB Protein Data Bank) using UCSF Chimera.

April 6, 2016

A production release candidate (v1.11) is available; please try it and report any problems. 64-bit builds are now recommended for all capable platforms, and v1.11 will be the last to support 32-bit builds. See the release notes for what's new.

(Previous news...)

Upcoming Events

UCSF Chimera is a highly extensible program for interactive visualization and analysis of molecular structures and related data, including density maps, supramolecular assemblies, sequence alignments, docking results, trajectories, and conformational ensembles. High-quality images and animations can be generated. Chimera includes complete documentation and several tutorials, and can be downloaded free of charge for academic, government, non-profit, and personal use. Chimera is developed by the Resource for Biocomputing, Visualization, and Informatics (RBVI), funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIGMS P41-GM103311).

UCSF ChimeraX (or simply ChimeraX) is the next-generation molecular visualization program from the RBVI, following UCSF Chimera. It is in early development and not yet publicly released, with release anticipated sometime in 2016.

Feature Highlight

realignment dialog

Multiple Sequence Alignment

Multiple sequence alignment of structure chains in Chimera or realignment of the sequences in an existing alignment can be performed using web services hosted by the UCSF RBVI. The following programs are provided:

The result is automatically shown in Multalign Viewer. (Sequences can also be added to an alignment one by one without a web service, but true multiple sequence alignment is often advantageous.) (More features...)

Gallery Sample

Orexin Receptor Complex

The image shows the structure of the human OX2 orexin receptor bound to the insomnia drug suvorexant, Protein Data Bank entry 4s0v. The drug is shown as spheres colored by element, and the receptor as ribbons with secondary structure elements rainbow-colored from blue at the N-terminus to red at the C-terminus. (More samples...)